Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean)

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The world renowned and one of the richest comedians is a stutterer. A British Rowan Atkinson who is known as Mr. Bean and famous among young and children equally is has a stutter disability. He had that disability by in his childhood which gave him a tough time in his childhood and at the start of his career. In this case study, I will highlight how Rowan Atkinson became Mr. Bean and how he continued his journey despite of his stuttering while everyone rejected him. As at the end of 2018, no other case study seemed to have addressed this severe problem of stuttering and formation of Mr. Bean. Case Description: Rowan Atkinson was suffering from stammering from his childhood. He was a Shy and self-oriented person. Instead of all these factors he overcome his fear and conquered the world. Comments: The chance of shyness, low confidence level and low level of employability increases in the presence of any disability. Rowan Atkinson is one of the persons with stuttering problem, but he did not close himself behind the door and faced the world with great courage, determination and enthusiasm.

Mr. Bean is a fictional character from the British comedy television programme Mr. Bean, its animated spin-off, and two live-action feature films. He was created and is portrayed by Rowan Atkinson and made his first appearance on television in the pilot episode which first aired on 1 January 1990.

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In 1983 the first installment of Blackadder, written by Atkinson and Curtis, slithered onto British TV screens. The show featured the twisted relationship between four incarnations of the groveling, spineless Lord Blackadder and his foully fleshed retainer, Baldrick, as they cajoled their way through history from the Crusades to the end of World War I. The series established Atkinson as one of England’s finest comic actors. It also led to the television program Mr. Bean (1990–95), which starred the rubber-faced Atkinson as a pratfalling, nearly mute buffoon, bumbling his way through everyday situations made comedic by his clumsiness and scheming. Transcending both the traditional boundaries of English humour and the verbal repartee of Blackadder, the working-class Bean attracted millions of devotees. Atkinson acknowledged the influence of French film actor Jacques Tati in the creation of the role: Tati’s recurring character Monsieur Hulot displayed a similarly wordless comic ineptitude in his films of the mid-20th century. Mr. Bean won the 1990 Montreux Festival Golden Rose, a 1991 International Emmy for best popular arts program, and a 1994 American Cable Ace Award. At its peak it was British television’s most popular comedy, drawing some 18 million viewers. In 1996 the show made the transatlantic jump to American television, and in 1997 Mr. Bean hit the big screen in the motion picture Bean and later Mr. Bean’s Holiday (2007), in which the eponymous antihero takes on France. The character also inspired an animated television series in 2002.

Meanwhile Atkinson appeared as Police Inspector Raymond Fowler in the television series The Thin Blue Line (1995–96). His other film credits included The Witches (1990, based on Roald Dahl’s book); Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994); Rat Race (2001); and Johnny English (2003), a spy spoof that spawned two sequels, Johnny English Reborn (2011) and Johnny English Strikes Again (2018). He also appeared in the popular romantic comedy Love Actually (2003).

Read About Surbhi Rathore at flawless-magazine.net

5 Fun Facts About Mr. Bean

1.ONLY 14 EPISODES OF MR. BEAN WERE EVER PRODUCED

Even the most dedicated fans have trouble reconciling the fact that only 14 episodes of the live-action series were ever produced. It did, of course, spawn two movies, an animated series (which returned to British television in 2015), a video game, and some books, including Mr. Bean’s Definitive and Extremely Marvelous Guide to France.

2.MR. BEAN WAS BROADCAST IN NEARLY 200 COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD

Because the bulk of the comedy is physical, not narrative, Mr. Bean has not gotten lost in translation. “There doesn’t seem to be a country in the world, or not that I have visited, or indeed none that I have heard of, who don’t seem to get him, who don’t seem to understand and enjoy the character of Mr. Bean,” Atkinson told ABC. “I think, and I’ve always assumed, it’s because he’s basically a child trapped in a man’s body.”

3.LOVE ACTUALLY DIRECTOR RICHARD CURTIS DEVELOPED MR. BEAN WITH ROWAN ATKINSON

Atkinson’s creative partner at the time, and the man who helped develop the character of Mr. Bean, was writer-director-producer Richard Curtis. The two collaborated on Not the Nine O’Clock News and Blackadder before Mr. Bean ever hit the airwaves. Curtis would later make the jump to the big screen as the writer of Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Bridget Jones’s Diary, and the writer-director of Love Actually, The Boat That Rocked, and About Time. (Which explains Atkinson’s cameo in Love Actually.)

4.ROWAN ATKINSON RETIRED THE ROLE IN LATE 2012

In an interview with The Telegraph in November of 2012, Atkinson admitted that Mr. Bean’s time was coming to an end. “The stuff that has been most commercially successful for me—basically quite physical, quite childish—I increasingly feel I’m going to do a lot less of,” Atkinson said. “Apart from the fact that your physical ability starts to decline, I also think someone in their fifties being childlike becomes a little sad. You’ve got to be careful.”

5.MR. BEAN’S CREATORS COULD NOT HAVE PREDICTED ITS SUCCESS

When asked about Mr. Bean’s enduring appeal during a BBC World Service radio interview earlier this year, executive producer Peter Bennett-Jones said, “I don’t think anyone could have anticipated quite how successful and long-lived it would be. Coming up to 25 years is an extraordinary thought since we first went on air on January 1, 1990. Mr. Bean’s been very good to us all, so we love Mr. Bean.

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